The Ancient Magus’ Bride

Everything must have a beginning — dandelions and more flower language in The Ancient Magus’ Bride

The premiere episode of The Ancient Magus’ Bride establishes Chise Hatori’s outlook on life as one of apathy. She no longer cares for her own well-being and sells herself into slavery because of this. Chise’s fluctuating mental state makes up the backbone of the series’ narrative. Much like the tagline “April showers bring May flowers,” our introduction to Chise marks both her distressing past and her hopeful future.

Framing this are a variety of flowers, all purposeful in their meanings at the peripheryor, in the case of the poppy flower, an upfront visual manifestation — of Chise’s story. Around each corner of the world that Chise explores is a flower or tree that informs her journey. The latest examples are the dandelion and nemophila (baby blue eyes) flowers, that bookend the series’ most recent story arc.

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The flower language of The Ancient Magus’ Bride Episode 1

The ink is still drying on Chise Hatori’s signature when the above line appears across the cityscape: April showers bring May flowers. Given Chise’s initial mental state in the opening moments of The Ancient Magus’ Bride, the proverb is obvious. Before reaching the point where she signs that contract, Chise has seen and lived through some horrifying things. This is her turning point.

The Ancient Magus’ Bride also uses flower language liberally throughout its first episode to set the mood, giving small hints and insight into Chise’s circumstances.

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