Author: ajthefourth

You'll have to add your own gravitas and glamour, because really, I'm just a dork.

The Flower Language of A Silent Voice Part 2: Marigolds and Miscellany

“People who know flower language will be able to interpret each one’s message and that’s great, but I made it so that even if you don’t you can feel something because of the shot’s layout or the flower’s color. I’m happy to let that audience have their own interpretation.”

A Silent Voice director Naoko Yamada on the usage of flowers in her film

This is the second of two posts on Naoko Yamada’s use of floriography or hanakotoba (flower language) in her movie adaptation of A Silent Voice. The first post, The Flower Language of A Silent Voice Part 1: Fireworks and Daisies, can be found here. It covers daisies, cosmos, and cyclamen, which frame the film’s two leads, Shoya Ishida and Shoko Nishimiya.

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The Flower Language of A Silent Voice, Part 1: Fireworks and Daisies

“People who know flower language will be able to interpret each one’s message and that’s great, but I made it so that even if you don’t you can feel something because of the shot’s layout or the flower’s color. I’m happy to let that audience have their own interpretation.”

A Silent Voice director Naoko Yamada on the usage of flowers in her film

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A look into the mind of Little Witch Academia’s Atsuko “Akko” Kagari

“Emotional pattern: yellow. Predictive ability: zero. Objectivity: zero. Traits: impulsive, selfish, pushy, simple, clumsy, carefree.”

-Croix’s personality analysis of Akko Kagari, Little Witch Academia, Episode 15

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Sakura Quest and Sincerity

When I was younger, I read a picture book called The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse. It’s one of the more popular Aesop’s Fables, like The Tortoise and the Hare, that are often given to children. I read it when I was young. So young that my memories of that age are mostly flashes of images or conversations rather than fully-developed scenes.

Ultimately, the lesson is that, while things may seem better in the city, there are perks and downfalls of living in both the city or the country. Neither is perfect and, although the country’s downsides are more easily visible, country life with safety and comfort is often preferable to the opulence and dangers of the city.

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Nidaime’s House: another child in The Eccentric Family

Supernatural stories at their finest ensure that — no matter how grand of a spectacle their conflicts become — they never stray away from intimate experiences with which their audience can resonate.

For example, one of the most affecting scenes in The Eccentric Family is that of an eldest brother holding up a smartphone to the ear of one of his younger brothers, a brother that just happens to be a frog. Visually, it’s ridiculous. Emotionally, it has the power to move a viewer’s heart, becoming an iconic image.

In its first season, The Eccentric Family started big before focusing on the personal struggles and triumphs of one tanuki family. This allowed the second season to immediately narrow its focus with a personal anecdote, then cast a wider net, capturing a few more conflicts before honing in on the personal once more. The problems and warmth of the Shimogamo family remain in the background — including a wonderful scene where Tousen, now the Shimogamo matriarch, visits her elderly mother — but the series has now shifted to include the devilish human trickster Tenmaya, and Professor Akadama’s (tengu Yakushibo Nyoigatake’s) estranged son Nidaime (Junior).

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